Lectora Audio Editor defaults to 22050Hz/16bit for WAVs

peter-richardson
peter-richardson Community Member Posts: 8
Hi all,



I have several high quality audio files recorded through Adobe Audition CC (96000Hz, 32 bit WAV files).



These files sound great when played in Audition or windows media player, however as soon as they are opened in Lectora audio Editor to embed events, the sound quality drops, sounding quite muffled by comparison (note that this is just opening the WAV file directly and playing it).



Saving the file as a .wav in Audio Recorder and reopening it in Audition shows that the WAV it is now a 22050Hz/16 bit file. Is there any way of forcing the lectora audio editor to open the file in at least CD quality? (44100Hz).



Note: Saving the file in 44100Hz in Audition makes no difference.



I am running Lectora Inspire 11.3.1

Comments

  • peter-richardson
    peter-richardson Community Member Posts: 8
    Failing that, is there any way to embed lectora-readable markers using Adobe Audition CC?
  • ssneg
    ssneg Community Member Posts: 1,456 ♪ Opening Act ♪
    1. I don't think you can change Lectora's audio editor output settings, at least I couldn't find it anywhere.



    2. Lectora uses two methods to store event information in audio files:



    For mp3 files, it creates an extra ID3 tag that contains XML data about the events. If you want, you can use any mp3 tag editor to copy that tag from a low quality mp3 into high-quality mp3. I guess this is the way to go in your case.



    For FLV files, it uses some sort of event-like metadata but it's not 100% compatible with e.g. FLV events that you can insert using Adobe Media Encoder (which should part of your CC Suite I guess). At least I tried reading Lectora-added events in AME and couldn't. Then I added some events in AME and tried to see them in Lectora and only saw one event, not all of them. Maybe if hack deeper into the Lectora FLV files, I'll be able to figure out the metadata format exactly and then it could be copied to any other higher quality FLV file.



    3. Lectora does not support events in WAV files. Although it definitely could, since WAV supports metadata that could be used just like mp3 metadata is used to store events. So any WAV files will be converted to either FLV or MP3.



    I hope this helps.
  • peter-richardson
    peter-richardson Community Member Posts: 8
    Thanks for getting back to me so quickly :)



    I have had a look at a file using Audition, and it comes back saying that metadata is corrupted. Viewing in Jaikoz Audio tagger and several other OSX programs also reveals nothing, i'm assuming that it is a custom field which is not showing up.



    Do you know a specific program which will view the XML? I am limited to OSX only here at work, however i can use windows at home.



    Cheers,



    Peter.



    @ssneg 59611 wrote:
    1. I don't think you can change Lectora's audio editor output settings, at least I couldn't find it anywhere.



    2. Lectora uses two methods to store event information in audio files:



    For mp3 files, it creates an extra ID3 tag that contains XML data about the events. If you want, you can use any mp3 tag editor to copy that tag from a low quality mp3 into high-quality mp3. I guess this is the way to go in your case.



    For FLV files, it uses some sort of event-like metadata but it's not 100% compatible with e.g. FLV events that you can insert using Adobe Media Encoder (which should part of your CC Suite I guess). At least I tried reading Lectora-added events in AME and couldn't. Then I added some events in AME and tried to see them in Lectora and only saw one event, not all of them. Maybe if hack deeper into the Lectora FLV files, I'll be able to figure out the metadata format exactly and then it could be copied to any other higher quality FLV file.



    3. Lectora does not support events in WAV files. Although it definitely could, since WAV supports metadata that could be used just like mp3 metadata is used to store events. So any WAV files will be converted to either FLV or MP3.



    I hope this helps.
  • ssneg
    ssneg Community Member Posts: 1,456 ♪ Opening Act ♪
    I used VLC player (hit Ctrl+I to see the file info), which free and also available on Mac.

    Here's what I got from an mp3 file with two events: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/11433463/trivantis/events.PNG
  • peter-richardson
    peter-richardson Community Member Posts: 8
    Unfortunately VLC shows nothing in the metadata area curiously enough (even with completely separate audio files, saved with one event as a test), however it still triggers events when used in Lectora. Odd.

    Well, i have been retasked to something else for a little while, so i think I will have to come back to it...